WHAT IS
HEART FAILURE?

Heart failure is a condition where the heart muscle weakens and is not able to pump blood efficiently. The term heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped pumping, but your heart muscle can’t pump enough blood to meet your body’s needs.

During heart failure the heart attempts to compensate for the lost pumping capacity, which can alter its shape and result in disorganized (or unsynchronized) and inefficient heartbeats.

RISK
FACTORS


CARDIOVASCULAR


  • Coronary artery disease.
  • Tachycardia (e.g. atrial fibrillation)
  • Bradycardia (e.g. third-degree atrioventricular block)
  • Uncontrolled hypertension or hypertensive crisis
  • Myocarditis
  • Acute pulmonary embolism
  • Acute valvular insufficiency (e.g. endocarditis, myocardial infarction)
  • Aortic dissection
  • Cardiac tamponade

NON-CARDIOVASCULAR


  • Infections and febrile states
  • Exacerbation of COPD or asthma
  • Kidney dysfunction
  • Anemia
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Exhausting exercise
  • Emotional tension
  • Pregnancy (Peripartum cardiomyopathy)

THE HEART FAILURE (HF)
CHALLENGE


One in 5 people
can expect to live with HF at some point in their lives1

1 https://www.hfpolicynetwork.org/project/the-handbook/

Heart Failure is the number 1 cause of
unplanned admissions1

3https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/heart-failure/what-is-heart-failure

HF patients have a diminished quality of life, problem with daily activities 3 and increased
anxiety.4

4Vongmany J, et al. Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2016;15:478-485

HEART FAILURE
SYMPTOMS


Heart failure is a progressive condition, which means it will gradually worsen. At first, you may not experience any symptoms, but as time elapses your heart’s pumping ability will continue to weaken, and you may experience some or all of the following symptoms:

WHAT CAUSES
HEART FAILURE?


Heart failure usually develops slowly after a heart injury. There is no single cause and it is often unknown. Some of the most common causes of heart failure are:

  • Previous heart attack (myocardial infarction)
  • Coronary artery disease
  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Heart valve disease
  • Infection of the heart (Myocarditis)
  • Congenital heart disease (condition you are born with)
  • Endocarditis (infection of the inner lining of the heart)
  • Diabetes (the body does not properly produce or use insulin)

When discussing with your doctor, you may want to use this document to help guide the conversation

When discussing with your doctor, you may want to use this document to help guide the conversation

Take care of your heartbeat is an educational initiative designed to inform people about heart rhythm disorders. It is brought to you by Medtronic.
Information on this site does not constitute medical advice.
Always consult with your physician about treatment options and if you have any questions or concerns about your health.

Last updated March 2021

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    TERMS AND CONDITIONS

    Information on this site does not constitute medical advice. Ask your doctor about diagnosis and treatment information.